Chess Wisdom and Basic Chess Principles

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The heart of the Chess Wisdom is a third of the way down from here. This is just about common sense wisdoms.

It's amazing but true but many players don't even understand the most basic simple principles of Rook and pawn use, like do you place a rook in front of a passed pawn or in back of a passed pawn?

Every time you get a passed pawn you will think of SaintEmilion telling you that, don't you ever forget, that a passed pawn is worth more than all of the Knights in Columbus and all of the gay bishops in Rome. So get a rook behind it as soon as possible.

How do many players of quick 1/0 and 2/0 games play chess? They use their memorized opening moves to start the game to try and gain an advantage in time, because of their lack of chess skills this is how they intend to win the game is on time and using Premove, not by out playing their opponent with their superior chess skills in which they are lacking. There is a name for these kinds of no skills players and it is called Clock-Players, or Clock-Watchers. However after the memorized moves play out they don't really have the slightest clue of how to play chess, so then they just begin an attack of pawns and pieces to destroy the center and in so doing chaos and mayhem results in a bloody battle both sides trying desperately trying to kill each other's king as quickly as possible or trade off every piece that they can to win because their opponent has not enough material to play and win any more.

This is no way to play chess. This is how young 7 year old kids play chess because they have not a clue of what playing chess is all about and don't want to know how either. They are just young very immature kids having fun pushing the pieces around the board as fast as they can to win on time. They are called, Woodpushers and patzers for their lack of chess skills. Is this really how you want to play chess too like young kids do?

After the warring factions have bludgeoned each other into oblivion and only the kings a few pawns and a remaining Knight. Bishop or Rook may exist acting as small dogs barking and snapping at the King's heels.

When the board is finally cleared of hostile pieces the kings now safe from attack of the heavy pieces are free to try to aid a pawn into a Queen. But since most FICS players don't have the first clue about basic endgame knowledge the King and their pieces just wander about like lost souls in the inky darkness of night.

Most FICS players don't want to study on how to play chess well or even know the most basic endgame mates such as King and Queen vs. King, King and Rook vs. King because their attention span is so short that they don't want the game to last that long that playing an endgame will result. Their hope is that their opponent will have lost on time long before that happens. This is another reason most play with out any increments because they are only playing chess to win on time, not to skillfully outplay their opponents.

In consideration of all of the chess principles that I have gave out, after much thought I have concluded that one of the more important and complex ones is the one of why people don't succeed in the Middlegame. Just think about it and ask your self the same question of why you or others don't succeed or have so many problems with the middle game and what can you think of why that is?

When a club member asked me that question I must confess I had not a remote clue of why that was true, but only that it was. So I began a long search and did much research for weeks, months and even years to find the answer. How do you ever determine such an answer when there are so many possibilities and possible questionable answers?

So after many years of frustrating searching, one day as if a bolt of lightning came out from nowhere, I finally concluded from all of my research that the answer was as plain as the nose on your face and that explains why it was so elusive and so hard to see. The answer is not blowing in the wind as many think.

The simple obvious single answer is fully explained in all of its intricacies at my chess training club in a very detailed page titled, Middlegame Strategy. After you read it you to will then say yes that makes perfect sense, why did I not think of that as well.

Middlegame Strategy

Middlegame Planing

Chess Wisdom and Basic Chess Principles Starts Here: No not there Here ------>

What Bobby Fischer really said was that in the endgame strong players, and frequently not so strong players usually always try to activate their king quickly into the middle of the board, and use their king as a fighting piece. This is another very important end game principle to use your king in the endgame as soon as possible.

Weaker players who don't have this endgame understanding instead just try to push their pawns quickly instead of activating their king to aid in their pawn development.

A basic principle in endgame theory is that its important to activate your king quickly to use the king to aid your pawn development. Weaker players who don't have this endgame understanding instead just try to push their pawns quickly.

The side with less space should initiate exchanges so that he will have more room to move about in. Conversely, the side with more space should avoid exchanges to keep his space advantage.

Lasker wrote that a position is never so bad that it can not be defended, however the antithesis is that a position is never so bad that it can't get worse, so beware of threats.

So if you think you have found a good move stop right there and don't move, look around and try to find a better move, or as soon as you move you will say DAM! why did I not see that good move and now its too late just because I was too impatient to do what SaintEmilion told me to do in his Chess Wisdom quips and witticisms.

Of course if you are a 3/0 quick game addict with the patience of a small child and insist on playing with no Incs (increments) to try to win on time then you most likely will not have the time to play in a prudent manner and will then just have to continue to muddle on in your usual incompetent ways and suffer the consequences of you being a irresponsible, inapt patzer.

Someone just asked me which is best the King Pawn Opening or The Queen Pawn Opining?

In the King Pawn Opening. 1.Sharp play ensues immediately. 2. Calculating variations is fundamental 3 . One opening slip could cost you the game. 4.Certain lines require a great deal of memorization. 5. The game is often shorter.

The Queen Pawn Opining 1. The fight is delayed until later in the game. 2. The King is less vulnerable, 3. Strategic play is fundamental. 4. Opening slips aren't as meaningful. 5. Memorizing lines is less necessary 6. The game usually last longer.

Chess Wisdom and Basic Chess Principles: In a bishop Endgame, the most effective way to push a pawn when you have a bishop, is to push it on to squares of the opposite color of your bishop, so that way you can cover both light and dark squares.

Pawn structure is the crucial determinant of the strength and weakness of bishops and knights. Knights are better in closed pawn positions and Bishops are better in open pawn positions. Knowing this principle may help you to decide whether or not to trade a bishop or knight.

A very basic but key principle with pawns is to always try to take towards the center.

Chess Wisdom: Beware of unnecessary, needless, superfluous, inessential, pawn moves. Always remember that once moved pawns can never go home. Especially protecting your castled king.

Remember that its pawn moves that are the most responsible for creating a imbalance and weaknesses in a pawn structure and a advantage either for you or against you if you are the one making them.

Chess Wisdom Quip: Do you know when you should trade pieces? Well do you or do you not? First, you're ahead in material, Second, you have a spatial disadvantage, Third, an exchange will make one of your surviving pieces more powerful, and finally when you will be getting rid of a very powerful piece of your opponent.

Chess Wisdom: If you don't play a move when it works, it might not work later when you want to play it

Lasker once wrote that a position is never so bad that it can not be defended, however the antithesis is that a position is never so bad that it can't get worse so always beware of threats or else pay the consequences.

How serious are you about improving? Then consider this. How badly do you really want it? What are you willing to give up to get it? What sacrifices are you willing to make to get it? How much value do you place on it? How much time are you willing to spend to achieve it? If you answer not much, then now you know exactly why you don't play better chess.

An Important Chess Principle. The promotion of a candidate pawn depends on assistance by it own neighbors. The operation of helping a candidate pawn to cross the guarded square or squares should always start with the advance of the candidate pawn itself.

So candidate first is the rule for such cases. Other initial pawn moves are basically unreliable. Candidate pawn first is known as Capablanca's rule of pawns. The rule is to first advance the candidate passed pawn, which has no enemy pawn obstructing its path. Or push the unopposed pawn first.

If you have a passed pawn should you put a rook in front of it or behind it? The rule is to put your rook behind it.

Chess Wisdom and Basic Chess Principles: One of the major differences between the strong player and weaker players is that strong players love to poke around and are always calculating looking for the principle weakness in the position to form a plan around and it is usually because of this critical weakness that his plan succeeds.

One of the most basic of chess principles is that if you want to win more games you must know how to form plans based on an imbalance in your opponent's camp that either you found or else that you created. However an imbalance is just that an imbalance nothing more. It's now up to you to convert that imbalance into an advantage for you.

Chess Wisdom and Basic Chess Principles: One of the major differences between the strong player and weaker players is that strong players always calculate looking for the principle weakness in the position to form a plan around and it is usually because of this critical weakness that his plan succeeds.

The way to win more games is to always stick to sound and basic chess principles and you will rarely ever go wrong. This is especially important right from the start in applying basic opening principles in your opening play, which is far more important than trying to memorize opening moves.

Chess games will come and go, but guiding chess principles will stick with you forever. They are that solid mortar between the bricks of chess knowledge in the basic foundation of chess building blocks for you to build on to increase your chess skills and they also apply well beyond the 64 squares.

Some principles are more important to lower rated players while some are more important to higher rated players but don't think that just because some seem overly simplistic that higher rated players don't occasionally suffer a loss because they act with indifference to lesser important ones like to castle early,

it happens all of the time, and this is your key to winning games against stronger players who sometimes recklessly ignore them with the indifference and arrogance of a novice player. This is how you may beat a higher rated player, by paying attention to all of the chess principles, no matter how unimportant they may seems to you.

One secret about studying chess basics and chess principles is that you will only get as much as you give. In other words if you are too lazy to give of your time and study to the chess principles, then you probably are a non-achiever as well and rarely rise up to a challenge and are able to express your self creatively..

It's the same in life in that anything of value that you want you must pay for it somehow and it's a principle in life as well that anything that you can get for nothing is usually worth just that, nothing.

How do you want to play chess?

When you play chess you have a choice. Do you want to fight for your honor and integrity by winning a game with your chess skills that you studied long and hard for to increase your pride and respect 0r do you want to degrade your charter trying to win games through the use of no increments trying to quickly win on time and through the use of internet gimmicks like premove.

Trying to win chess games with luck instead of using chess skills because your opponent runs out of time is hardly a game you can be proud of wining and gaining prestige through achievement. Rising up the rating ladder takes hard work and time in the study of basic chess fundamentals and the putting into practice of those learnt skills

Those who are forever looking for the easy and quick way to win games fail to realize that its losses that eventually lead to wins. Pain leads to strength because then you can appreciate that it's only through hard work that your going to improve by digging deep into the soul of chess. Bad positions that lead to mistakes and then losses lead to creativeness in your determination to improve.

As you play chess or do anything that requires completion it is absolutely critical to value the learning process as the key to rebound from setbacks as opposed to your bruised ego preventing you from seeing that only in study and hard work will you improve as opposed to looking for some easy ways to win games, like trying to win on time.

Trying to win games with out suffering for it through hard work, will lead you into the trap of always relying on trying to take the shortcuts to carry you through life. This kind of thinking that you have talent is cheap and if you continue to rely on it, your ride will be short, brittle and disappointing because you can not have pride in that which you do not have to work for to achieve success

Those who are always looking for quick, painless wins with out working for them and are constantly finding ways to avoid hard work escalate into a sluggish journey crashing into the quicksand and sinking into the depths of the abyss of despair.

Such indifference to avoiding the reality of doing what is prudent gains momentum and will draw you into a black hole of desperation that you will never be able to crawl out of, because never will you be able to shift to loving the game for its beautiful art and clever thought.

If you don't even try to learn any chess skills through study then you should realize that it is players like you that bring down the prestige, and reputation of FICS as being a chess server as one of admiration for its skilled and knowledgeable players, and are also responsible for chasing away other potentially skilled players to other chess servers who don't want to play with a bunch of lazy, chess patzers.

If all you ever do is to play quick chess games without using increments all you will be doing is to play like the patzers do pushing the pieces around the board like amateur woodpushers do most likely not even knowing any opening plays well. An observation of most players at FICS playing games seem to be that most just play automatically especially early in the game. They either play the opening moves from memorization and just go through the motions, develop their pieces and continue on using tactics instead of forming a plan around a weakness or imbalance.

Or else they play like they have not a clue on how to play any opening at all and just push pawns out aimlessly, with no thought at all of seeking development and getting a safe king before they engage into a battle. They tend to violate every opening principle in the book like bringing out their Queen as soon as they can and then wonder why their opponent is so quickly getting the upper hand on them

Its as though the active part of their brain has been turned off and so they try to attack instead of beginning to make a creative plan.

The perplexing question is why do so many play in such a mediocre and reckless way? Are they too lazy to study up on how to improve their chess skills? They are just indifferent to trying to win games using learnt chess skills and like many have said that its not important if you win or not, they use this excuse to cop out and say, I am here just to have fun and rating points are not important.

Those who use no increments have the patience and values of a small child and just want to play chess games as quickly as they can, win or lose and then quickly get on with the next game. Chess skills are not something that their immature minds value as something that they feel is worth having.

Proofs of the majority of most to be indifferent to learning chess skills is that if you ask most players if they would be interested in going to a chess academy to learn how to play chess well even if its free, will decline.

The most common error players make is to spend all of their time memorizing openings with which they think they can win lots of games quickly. There is nothing more tempting than trying to win games fast by memorizing openings. But this is a terrible mistake. If you memorize variations, you may do well in the short run, but over time you'll falter because you're not learning the heart of chess.

The problem with spending all of ones time in memorization openings and little else is that after your memorized opening moves play out then you are at a loss of what to do next and so you try to rely on your tactics to get you through the game, Tactics alone is not enough. You will always fail and lose to the player who studied all of the principles and basic fundamentals of chess.

If you want to win lots of chess games then do like all of the masters have done and study the endgame the soul of chess This may sound counter-intuitive to some people because you may be working on lots of positions that you may never see again but this is the right way to go as has been proven to be the successful way as this is how players rise up to become strong master rated chess players.

If you take the time to study chess basics, chess principles and the basic fundamentals of the endgame and then play against those who only try to memorize openings, as the games progresses, you will get stronger and they will get weaker because then you are moving towards your area of comfort, the endgame, and they are leaving their memorized openings.

The most important thing about studying the endgame and chess principles instead of the memorization of opening play is that this way you enjoy the beauty of chess without being completely focused on winning. A key component on the road to mastery is to embrace the journey as opposed to fixating on results ==============================================================================================================================================================================================================================================

Chess Wisdom and Basic Chess Principles

THE IMPORTANT CHESS PRINCIPLES TO WINNING GAMES

Important Pawn principles

The pawn is arguably the most important element of evaluating chess positions, because pawn structure is what gives dynamic potential to all the other pieces

One of the most important chess principles to understand is pawn structure because its bad pawn structure, pawn moves, that is the most responsible factor in creating chess weaknesses. You must always remember that once you move a pawn it can never go back.

How many of these pawn terms are you familiar with, and do you understand the strengths and weakness of each? Doubled pawns, Isolated pawns, isolated d-pawn, isolated pawn couple, pawn islands, pawn chains, passed pawn, protected passed pawn, outside

passed pawn, pawn phalanx, pawn nail, outpost pawn hole, pawn outpost, backward pawns, fixed pawns, pawn majority, pawn minority, pawn center, hanging pawns, candidate passed pawn, Capablanca's Rule. of pawns, Pawn principles of weak squares.

Pawn structure is the crucial determinant of the strength and weakness of bishops and knights. Knights are better in closed pawn positions and Bishops are better in open pawn positions. Knowing this principle may help you to decide whether or not to trade a bishop or knight.

A key principle with pawns is to always try to take towards the center

A bishop is good if its fixed or immobile pawns are on the opposite color, so they don't block its moves, and the opponent's fixed pawns are on the same color, providing targets.

A subtlety about a pawn principle, which is a distinction that is more advanced for strong players, is that in the middle game or opening, you should place your focus on central pawns that are fixed when evaluating bishops and where to place your bishops, while in the endgame you should focus on all pawns.

Pawn structure determines weak squares. Weak squares can be used for outposts for our pieces Important are squares in or near the enemy camp that can be supported by your pieces or your pawns but cannot be defended by your opponents pawns Try to occupy that square with a piece that is less valuable than any of your opponent's pieces that can capture it, this can lead to a huge strategic advantage

If you notice, weak squares in your opponent's position, that you can take advantage of, then you can make powerful long-term decisions.

Don't trade off pieces when you have a positional or spatial advantage. Conversely the principle of trading is that when you have a spatial disadvantage, its good to trade down..

If your position is cramped, trading pieces will relieve your pressure. Trading pawns maybe an easy way out. On the other hand, when your opponent is cramped, you want to increase pressure without allowing the liberation of exchanges.

The principle of the spatial advantage is that you want to increase pressure and avoid most exchanges. When you are defending positions with a spatial disadvantage, obviously the reverse holds true. You want to trade down as much as possible.

The principle of trading down is that you should trade down when ever an exchange will make one of your surviving pieces more powerful. For example when you have a bad bishop. That is if you have a bishop that is locked in by its own pawns which are fixed on the same color squares traveled by the bishop then you should try to trade it off for one of your opponents good bishops.

If you have a good bishop don't exchange it unless you have a very good reason. Try to fix your opponents pawns on the same color squares occupied by his bishop. Then you can try to invade on the squares that his bad bishop can't protect.

For those of you that feel that you don't need to study chess principles because your not really interested in rising up the ladder, because you only play chess just to have fun, then remember this that engaging in the study of the chess fundamentals is a wonderful opportunity to learn and work your mind for those of you that fortunately have one to work.

One secret about studying chess basics is that you will only get as much as you give. In other words if you are too lazy to give of your time and study then you probably are a non-achiever and rarely rise up to a challenge to do those things that can make you proud of your accomplishments..

Chess Wisdom and Basic Chess Principles: When you have your opponent's king running away from your attacking pieces, you should be planning to create a mating net. What do you do? You drive the king closer and closer towards your camp. All your warriors, chase him towards your pawns, bring him away from his camp and his defenses and closer into your camp towards your pawns to trap and mate him

In an open position, instead of allowing your pawns to remain stationary, one of your goals should be is to create a expansion of the central pawn structure This is one of the principles of chess that whoever has more space has an advantage.

Very often chess players, see two knights connected in such a way that one knight protects the other and they think that those knights are very strong because they're reinforcing one another.

The fact is that often those knights can hurt one another because they're redundant. If you can figure out how to attack the most advanced knight then you get rid of the advanced redundant knight and force your opponent to be placed in a defending position. Because these two knights are defending one another they are also replicating one another

The basic purpose of the Caro-Kann Defense (1. e4 c6) is safety and security, plus the hope that White will overreach himself trying to penetrate Black's defensive front.

In attacking with your bishops, generally it's better to retain the king-bishop because of its ability to strengthen the kingside against onslaught, mayhem and chaos.

The plan of developing your forces around a key central square is playing good chess.

In chess parlance, or manner of speaking, when a player has forced the exchange of a Bishop for one of his Knights, he is said to have won the two Bishops.

If you don't play a move when it works, it might not work later when you play it.

Watch out for a chance to use the double attack, for few defenders can dance at two weddings at the same time.

At the 1895 Hastings tournament Harry Nelson Pillsbury, 1872-1906, whipped out 4. Bc1 to g5, pinning blacks knight to his Queen and scored a number of striking wins, and it's been the main line ever since, so. remember, that a pin can be mightier than the sword!

Generally the more advanced your center pawns are, the greater will be your space and the more room you have behind enemy lines the more room you will have to maneuver. And generally having more space than your opponent is said to have a advantage over your opponent in playing positional chess.

More specifically, its the advanced d-pawn, across the demarcation line on d5, that gives White more operating territory while concomitantly cramping Black, or vice versa conversely

The promotion of a candidate pawn depends on assistance by it own neighbors. The operation of helping a candidate pawn to cross the guarded square or squares should always start with the advance of the candidate pawn itself. So candidate first is the rule for such cases. Other initial pawn moves are basically unreliable.

Candidate pawn first is known as Capablanca's rule of pawns. The rule is to first advance the candidate passed pawn, which has no enemy pawn obstructing its path. Or push the unopposed pawn first.

The principle of two weaknesses is especially important in the endgame. If you can play so that your opponent has two pawns hanging for example, on either side of the board, if you and your opponent trade off enough material, he may not be able to defend both pawns in the endgame and this could be the decisive factor for you in wining that game.

A very important principle to remember here about pawns is that it is usually pawn moves that result in an imbalance and either provide a advantage for you or creates one for your opponent to take advantage of in your camp. Always remember that once you move a pawn forward it can never go home or move back to its original position.

You should always remember that a passed pawn is worth more than all of the Knights in Columbus and all of the gay Bishops in Rome, so if you get one remember that you need to get a rook behind it to push it ahead.

Whenever your opponent makes a pawn move, think what have they left behind? You must think and look for what they have left behind, look for the space left behind. That space may be a wonderful opportunity just waiting for you to take advantage of like they created a weakness, a weak square or outpost for you to put your knight or bishop into.

How do you feel after you make a mistake or blunder? Don't let it upset you. The way to handle this is to simply come back to the moment just after the upset and play the chess game that's on the board.

This is often the best answer to things. Just return to the immediate situation on the board. Don't think about the result. Don't get riled and think about losing. Don't think about anything at all except playing chess as best as you can.

Chess Inspiration: A good way to progress in chess and get self-motivated may be with a good friend, a comrade who you and he can work hard together to analyze your games to find your weaknesses and together as a team challenge others. This kind of camaraderie friendship might do wonders in helping you, and your friend to improve. Just remember that a friend in need is a good friend indeed.

More Chess Inspiration: Some years ago there were 3 close friends here that did work together to improve. They would challenge others that their little group of 3 much like the 3 amigos in the book, The Three Musketeers, were invincible, which they were not at all really all that good, however it helped them to improve somewhat and have a lot of fun as well.

They even would have fun bragging how much more skilled they were than of the other two and of course a fight would ensue in battles of Blitz games between themselves which others would delight in watching.

They had great fun in admonishing and chiding others of their greatness and how each of the 3 were ready to take on in turn anyone who thought that they could beat all three of them in a row one after the other. Their blitz ratings were approximately in the 1400 to 1500 and their Standard ratings were little more.

A friend told me about them and I watched in earnest to see if they did improve their play using each other to keep focused and motivated to improve their chess skills.

One thing became apparent that this kind of game of being like the Three Musketeers helped improve their motivation to improve their chess skills because of the completion between the 3 to outdo the others and because they were having such great fun kibitzing each other and everyone else as well helped to ease the stress in their games. They had a ball doing this and so could you.

What is a friend? A friend is someone who will loan you money and not expect you to pay it back.

A great psychology advantage may be had in the ability to maintain the tension in a position and is often more important than the chess position itself.

If you are ahead in material, trade down. That will actually increase your advantage. If you have a positional advantage, a spatial advantage, don't trade down.

A rook going to the seventh rank is always a very strong. A rook on the seventh rank is called a pig, because it can just pick off all the pawns, and eat everything.

Usually as a rule in chess, a bishop and rook are a little bit better than a rook and knight. While a queen and knight is usually a little bit better than a queen and bishop.

The pawn is arguably the most important element of evaluating chess positions, because pawn structure is what gives dynamic potential to all the other pieces.

. .. An advantage of spending time in the study of endgame theory is that the stronger endgame player will usually try to quickly navigate into the subtleties of an early end game with a defter touch.

Endgame specialists always try to make their opponent make many small pawn structural weaknesses in the opening and middle game and then they quickly head for the endgame where they then can convert those advantages into a queening pawn.

One way a endgame specialist gets a queening pawn is to create many small pawn structure weaknesses on both sides of the board of his opponent and he will also try to get an outside pawn majority or a passed pawn on both sides of the board this is called using the principle of two weaknesses in endgame theory.

Once this is done then in the endgame, his opponents king becomes overloaded trying to defend his pawns on both sides of the board from capture and also trying to stop a queening pawn on either side of the board. No mater what he does he can't stop both passed pawns at either side of the board at the same time. This is a big part of high-level positional chess, in navigating pawn structures.

To become a endgame specialists you must first start with knowing what makes up bad pawn structural weaknesses and what both bad pawns and good pawns are. These are the bad pawns that make up the bad pawn weaknesses both in your camp and of your opponents to focus in on..

Here is a list of bad pawns you should know about. Doubled pawns, Backward pawns, Hanging pawns, usually the isolated pawn, hanging pawn phalanx. These are the good pawns. Passed pawn, Outside passed pawn, Protected passed pawn, pawn nail, advanced pawn chain, offside pawn majority, mobile pawn wing, and pawn levers.

Once in the endgame, strong players usually always try to activate their king into the middle of the board, and use their king as a fighting piece. This is another very important end game principle to use your king in the endgame as soon as possible.

One thing you have to know about endgame theory with king and pawn in the end game with a rook pawn, if the defending king can reach the corner that your rook pawn is headed for, before your king can prevent it then it is always a draw.

In the end game with pawns on both sides of the board, a bishop is a little bit stronger than the knight.

In the endgame when two kings are horizontally opposing one another with one square in between, the person whose move it is not, has the opposition and the advantage .

When you are stumped as to how to move, it may be wise to just govern your next move by a basic chess principle. When playing chess, most every move you make should not go against basic chess principles and conversely you should try to force your opponent to violate basic chess principles.

If you are going to play chess and continue to maintain your interest in it you need to learn how to love chess. And the best way for that to happen is for the game to be in harmony with your being.

Because chess is not just a game. If approached with an open heart, it can become a fascinating channel of self-expression and self-discovery, something that is very hard to do when playing quick games with out any increments because you seldom have the time to calculate brilliant combinations, your mostly just being a mediocre wood pusher trying to win a game of chess on time.

Chess can also be loved for the beauty you may find when a well thought out combination results in a beautiful mate for you. Usually this only happens when you play long games however because usually only long games provide you with the time you will need to find these types of combinations.

There is a relationship between the bishop and knight where if there are two squares between them, the bishop dominates the knight. If this happens then the Knight can't move because all of the squares that the knight wants to go to are covered by the bishop and that may stop all of the knights counter play.

When someone says this players is well educated in the Russian school of chess, do you know what that means? Usually it refers to a players endgame skills that this player spent a lot of time in the study of endgame theory.

If you are going to be an attacking player, you must be willing to give up material for long term positional attacking chances. In the Russian school of chess making sacrifices and long term positional planning is what is stressed. The Russian school of chess teaches that learning endgame theory is of primary importance and to use your endgame skills you must be making long-term positional plans.

If you move a pawn on the side you are going to be attacked, usually you are exposing a new weakness.

A basic chess principle is that: rooks belong behind passed pawns.

Very often in chess, the threat is stronger than the execution.

Expanding on the flank is often a very good way to undermine an opponent's central control.

In general, once you have your opponents king on the run a good way to finally give mate is to keep on driving the enemy king in your direction towards your camp. In other words, force him further and further away from his defenders and towards your attackers.

Whenever one of your pieces has tension on one of your opponents pieces, then you are in control of all the tactics. At anytime, any moment in any combination, you have the option of taking that piece then your opponent has to constantly figure that into his calculations. So don't remove that tension, always, always try to maintain it.

Virtually all attacks that succeed with strong players , are guided by the core of positional principles. If you will take the time to learn the solid principles of positional chess as your foundation, you will have the arsenal you need for playing better chess. All that is left is to become skilled in harmonizing using those principles, and that just takes practice.

Whenever your opponent makes a pawn move on the king side, usually he will give you a weakness, a target to go after. For example if your opponent is black and plays G6, he has given you a target. So you play H4, H5 with the idea of opening up the king side by using his G6 move. This follows one of the basic principles of chess in that its usually pawn moves that create an imbalance and weakness in your opponents pawn structure that you should try to take advantage off, or visa versa.

If you are given the choice of taking with two pieces, a rule to observe is that you want to keep as many centralized pieces in the middle of the board as possible, so you take with the least centralized piece.

One thing you will observe if you examine the games of even very strong players is that if they ignore and are indifferent to the principles of chess to castle early frequently suffer the consequences of that action sooner or later.

Such reckless playing as not castling early in the game is usually thought to only apply to patzers who don't know any better, however it seems to be amazing how often even strong Grand Masters get into serious trouble from either ignoring this rule or being prevented from castling and not taking steps to castle and instead jump right in attacking.

Rudoff Spielmann from Austria vs. Paul Keres, Grandmaster who is considered one of the strongest players to never become World Champion. won the game in 26 moves in 1938 in the Noordwijk tournament playing the C11, French defense possibly because he prevented Spielmann from castling kingside with a Bishop on a7 is one such example of a player, Spielmann, not being able to castle early and suffered the consequences of it.

A game you may find interesting for examining how an over aggressive player like Spielmann suffered from not observing this rule as the game soon became utter chaos and Spielmann lost the game to a very strong powerhouse Estonian Grandmaster from trying to impose his will on a calm, present opponent like Keres, who turned the energy of the attack against him.

Once you have studied and learnt the foundational arsenal of basic chess principles you will just know when something is off when your opponent makes what you may think is a bad move that has violated one of those principles. .

Bells will go off, your intuition will sound off a alarm to you and you will stop and think something is amiss here that I can exploit if I can just find it. You will smell it. Something is here!. I just have to find it and take advantage of it to win this game.

If you take the time to study the games of the great Paul Morphy you will see how he was able to sense a small inaccuracy in his opponents play and find a violation of the principles and then he would jump all over it with a vicious attack. In his game of Schulten vs. Murphy you will see how Murphy takes advantage of such a violation of not castling early.

The first principle of trading is to trade down in the endgame when you are ahead in material.

Thed second principle of trading is that when you have a spatial disadvantage, it's good to trade down.. If your position is cramped, trading pieces will relieve your pressure. On the other hand, when your opponent is cramped, you want to increase pressure without allowing the liberation of exchanges.

The third principle of trading is when an exchange will make one of your surviving pieces more powerful, it's usually a good idea. to exchange it.

The fourth principle of trading is, you trade when you will be getting rid of a very powerful piece of your opponent.

A general rule with many exceptions is that bishops are a little stronger than knights in open games, while knights sometimes have an edge in locked down pawn structures in closed games.

Pawn structure is the crucial determinant of the strength and weakness of bishops.

In the middle game or opening, you should focus on central pawns that are fixed when evaluating bishops, while in the endgame, you should focus on all pawns.

The critical themes to understanding king and pawn endgames are Opposition and Critical Squares. The Rule of the Critical Squares for the white player is when the pushed pawn reaches the fifth rank is that the white king only has to occupy one of the critical squares one rank in front, not two.

So for example after White plays pawn to e5, no matter whose move it is, if White's king can occupy either of the critical squares of d6, e6, or f6 the position is winning for white.

This is the basic theory of king and pawn endgame, and knowing just this one principle could make the difference in whether you win or lose a endgame. Now does it not make sense to study endgame theory?

In calculating endgames it is very hard to see if your pawn can queen if your opponents king is far away from it to stop the pawn from queening. However there is a quick trick to do it. It.

It is called Being in the Square of the Pawn. The first side of the square is determined by extending up from the pawn to the queening square. Now count an equal number of squares to the left or right and you have a square where all sides are of equal length

If your opponents king is outside of this square the pawn can queen. For example say your pawn is on c4. Counting up to h8 is 4 squares. Now count to the right to g4.4 squares.

If the king is on g4 he can stop ii he is in the square. However if the king is on g3 he can't because he is outside of the pawn's square. Of course where your king is in relation to your pawn will make a difference as well.

If you want to have some fun get a board and put your pawn on c4 and your king on c3. Now put your opponents king on c8 and now see if you can queen the pawn or if the game results in a draw. Of course its much more fun if you are using a chess computer as your opponent in this position. You may want to review the critical theme in understanding king and pawn endgames of Opposition and Critical Squares.

Its important to understand the principle of mutual Zugzwang. If you imagine that nothing is on the board except for the Black king on e5 and your white king on d3 and our two central pawns.

The black pawn on d4 and your white pawn on e4. This is a good example of mutual Zugzwang. Who's king must move first will lose a-pawn.. This is a very important concept in the endgame and could make a difference between winning and losing.

In the endgame with only your two pawns one file apart from one another can defend themselves from your opponents king because the pawns can create a barrier stopping the king from advancing. If Black goes right, you go left. If Black goes left, you go right. Those two pawns are self sufficient. The two pawns, one file away, protect one another.

Paradoxically, pawns two files away from each other are much harder to coordinate than one file away because they don't create a barrier stopping your opponent's king from advancing to take the other pawn.

A basic principle in endgame theory is that its important to activate your king quickly to use the king to aid your pawn development. Weaker players who don't have this endgame understanding instead just try to push their pawns quickly.

This is the major difference between players of different endgame understanding that the stronger players know and understand how to use their king in the endgame fight and that is one reason that they are stronger players.

In the endgame knowing how to gain the opposition can allow your king to advance and take control of a critical square. Taking control of a critical square in turn may then allow you to queen a pawn. So the fight between two kings to determine which one is stronger is called taking the opposition. However having the opposition is only a means to a end and not the end itself.

If two kings are only two squares away from each other with a pawn in-between who ever has to move first loses the opposition and the advantage to advance into his opponents position, either losing the pawn or possibly queening the pawn.

If the two kings are separated by more than two squares apart then this is called distant opposition. The rule then is whoever is to move when there is an odd number of squares between the kings does not have the opposition. The reverse is whoever is to move when there is a even number of squares between the kings has the opposition.

Mastering the concept of triangulation will give you the opposition and may win the game for you. The process involves moving in a small triangular pattern to waste a move so that you are able to gain the opposition.

This process may also involve taking the distant opposition by placing a even or odd number of squares between the kings to gain the opposition. Remember that whoever is to move when there is a even number of squares between the kings has the opposition.

Lucena's Position is the most important position in rook and king in endgame playing. If you can achieve this position you will win by queening your single pawn so the defender must avoid it all costs.

Lucena's Position was first mentioned in a book by Salvio published in 1634. The original analysis of the endgame has been attributed to Scipione Genovino at an earlier date.

It is interesting to note that Lucena didn't mention this position in his book published in 1497 instead he looked at some openings and also compared chess with feminism. Lucena felt they were both forms of warfare. Why this endgame position got his name has never been clear and remains a complete mystery

I tried to discuss this anonymity of unclear origin of Lucena getting the credit for this position with Scipione in 1635 but he just gave me a angry long hard stare.

Philidor's Position is the Second most important position in rook and king endgames, Lucena Position being the first. Even though black has no pawns he can draw easily by putting his king in front of white's passed pawn, as long as he knows about Philidor's position and how to use his rook in such positions. Black to play must decide how he is going to prevent White from making progress. A tiny bit of knowledge makes this question superfluous.

If you think that you need something to keep up your interest and enthusiasm to excel in playing chess then you might want to take a look at what is called long term game goals. These types of goals involve long term plans based on more involved chess principles that are not basic chess principles but never the less are still chess principles. They consist of making long term plans based on opportunities that you can plan for. Here are a few of these plans you can study for.

A key part of the Minority Attack, The Carisbad Variation from the International Karlsbad Tournament of 1923, is a very important part in understanding the Minority Attack as well as The Carlsbad Pawn Structure.

Using the principle of two weaknesses. Your plan is to try to get two pawn majorities on each side of the board so that you can get a passed pawn on both sides of the board. Once you do this or even have the threat to do this few defenders can dance at two weddings at the same time and one of the pawns will queen.

3. Greater space advantage. 4. Superior development 5. Placement of a Knight or Bishop on a strong outpost station or weak square. 6.Rooks on the seventh rank. 7. Control of the center. 8. Offside pawn majority. 9. A queenside majority in the endgame.

Lower rated players like to attack, very often thinking that an attack merely consists of delivering tactical blows, combinations and sacrifices. Certainly all this plays a very important role, but the success of an offensive does not only depends on tactical skills alone. Exact planning, creating all necessary preconditions, choosing the right time and place. All these are indispensable features of an attack too. In other words, the preparation and realization of an attack also requires strategical skills.

Do you know when you should trade pieces? First, you're ahead in material, Second, you have a spatial disadvantage, Third, an exchange will make one of your surviving pieces more powerful, and finally when you will be getting rid of a very powerful piece of your opponent. Lasker wrote that a position is never so bad that it can not be defended, however the antithesis is that a position is never so bad that it can't get worse.

How serious are you about improving? How badly do you really want it? What are you willing to give up to get it? What sacrifices are you willing to make to get it? How much value do you place on it? How much time are you willing to spend to achieve it? If you answer not much, then now you know why you don't play better chess.

Have you ever considered that one important purpose of the opening is to prepare a solid position for a successful entry into the Middlegame? Many players are having problems with the true Middlegame because they really never completed their development of the opening phase of the game.

They stopped short and entered into Middlegame tactics before they finished their work in the opening phase of the game. They did not spend enough time in the opening phase of the game to prepare a solid foundation for entry into the Middlegame.

Most think that the Opening is: The beginning phase of a game, which is usually through the first dozen moves but can go much further. It is usually written that the main opening objectives are

1. Develop your pieces in a quick and efficient manner; 2. Occupy as much of the center as possible 3. Castle early and bring the King to safety. These objectives may be basically correct but this in not the real purpose of the opening.

More Chess Wisdom and Basic Chess Principles: The real purpose of the opening is to create an IMBALANCE and DEVELOP your pieces in such a way that that they all work together in harmony to making that imbalance a favorable attribute to give you an edge to take advantage of. Remember that an imbalance is just that.

Its simply a difference in the two respective positions. It is now the players responsibility to turn that difference into an advantage.

Although there are basically seven ways to create an imbalance, one of the easiest ways to create an imbalance is to create a pawn weakness in your opponents pawn structure.

You should always be aware that most weaknesses are created by pawn moves. The seven major imbalances are: Superior Minor Piece, Pawn Structure, Space, Material, Control of a key file or Square, Lead in Development and taking the Initiative.

When you are advancing pawns in Bishop endgames, you advance them on the opposite color of your Bishop. So that way, you can control both the light squares with the pawns, and the dark squares with the Bishop. Or, the light squares with the Bishop and the dark squares with the pawns this way you can control everything.

More Chess Wisdom and Basic Chess Principles: What do you do when you have pawn weaknesses? Victor Korchnoi is one of the great endgame players in the world and Victor believes that weaknesses must be pushed. He believes that when you have pawn weaknesses, you push them up forward and in so doing you give them strength.

In the Endgame a lot of the time you do not think tactically, you think strategically. You discover the ideal posts for your pieces and then you occupy them.

The most effective way to push a pawn when you have a bishop, is to push it on to squares of the opposite color of your bishop, so that way you can cover both light and dark squares.

A principle of the endgame is that if you have a outside passed rook pawn that has a queening square which is of the same color as your bishop this should be a winning position.

it is important for a player to have a understanding of the basic principles of the endgame. In a King pawn King endgame if your opponent has a pawn on h2 and is trying to queen it but his bishop is a light squared bishop not only may he not be able to queen his pawn but he also may not be able to stop you from drawing the game because he can't control the dark square on h8 with his light square bishop, nor can he prevent you from occupying h8 if you know how to play such endgame positions.

These are the types of good endgame problems for you to try to work out with a board to see how it can be done.

This kind of knowledge is privy to any Grand Master, International Master or Master playing this kind of endgame and you may be able to declare a draw if this position comes about depending on where your king is placed on the board.

In the endgame a healthy queenside majority is often decisive.

When you're ahead with material, what do you do? You trade down and when you are being attacked, what do you do? You also trade down.

Whenever you make a mistake what do you do? You should collect yourself and say ok, I made a mistake I am going to accept that and prepare for the worst. I will trade Queens and stop my opponent's attack and go into a position, which I may be able to defend.

Don't get riled or you won't be able to think properly. Collect your thoughts and make a plan based on your advantages and your opponent's weaknesses. Clarity of mind is everything when you make a mistake.

One of the most telling ways to spot the weaker player from the stronger player is that the weaker player tries to force something and always have attack on their minds, while the stronger player is instead playing positional chess and is thinking ahead with longer ranged plans, maybe even to the endgame.

There is always something inherently risky about trying to impose your will on a position. If you violate the position and try to force something out of nothing then the cool headed positional player has the opportunity to pick apart your game and will use that adversity to his advantage.

He will think about what did you leave behind when you moved your pawn to attack? A nice weak square and a perfect outpost for my knight to jump into that is going to be a real thorn in your side right in your camp that is going to make my endgame attack much easier later on.

Often when your opponent pushes the envelope and tries to force something with a forcing pawn move, they may overlook a quiet simple move that takes advantage in a more subtle way of the space that they left behind. A square has been weakened for you to take advantage of.

Part One Of Chess Wisdom and Basic Chess Principles

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