Understanding The Queen's Gambit D37

57 Games to Study

1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Nf3 Be7 5.Bf4

The Queen Gambit D37 with 5.Bf4

Most every one is familiar with the Queen's Gambit Declined Defense, (1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Nf3) It has been part of the repertoire of all World Champions and dates back to Damiano in 1512. But how many are familiar with the Queen's Gambit with 5.Bf4 as an opening for White? 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Nf3 Be7 5.Bf4. 0-0

Basic D37 Gambit

The idea of 5.Bf4-system in the Queen's Gambit is obvious: before playing e2-e3 the bishop is developed outside of the pawn chain. Instead of pinning the Knight, White prefers to exert pressure on the b8-h2 diagonal. This system contains various strategic options for White: from a dry siege on the isolated queen pawn to a sharp mating attack.

Developing with 5.Bf4 instead of the usual place at g5 continues to be a viable alternative. The main line continuation is 5 . . . 0-0 6.e3 c5 7.dxc5 Bxc5. White often castles Queenside and hurls his Kingside pawns forward attacking with lively play.

My Mega Chessbase, Data base shows this game being played for the first time in regular practice in 1887 with the moves (1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bf4).

In one of these games in 1887 between the English player Joseph Blackburne (1841-1924) and Jean Taubenhaus, Blackburne made Taubenhaus, Black, resign in 43 moves.

However according to my Mega Database , 4.Bf4 had been played by the Polish player Daniel Harrwitz in some games in 1853. In his game, with Loewenthal, Loewenthal Black, resigned after move 31. That game also was; 1. d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bf4 and there are some books that also contain even earlier games with 4.Bf4.

In an Opening Report for my Mega Database checking the History shows the earliest game with 5.Bf4 as between Kieseritzky,L - Calvi,I in Paris in 1842, and the latest grandmaster game was Mikhalchishin, Adrian against Short, Nigel in 2001.

If you compare the 5.Bf4-system with the main lines of the Queen's Gambit with 5.Bg5 in the Mega Database you will find that it had been played considerably less often than now. During the last few years 5.Bf4 has become enormously popular. The number of games played has jumped from less than a handful in 1975 to over 350 games in the year of 2000. Total of games played over the years to 2000 are 3594.

This is due to the great reliability of the black build up in the Tartakower and Lasker systems. (5.Bg5 0-0 6.e3 h6 7.Bh4 b6 or 7Ne4) Now White is trying to avoid these systems and discovered 5.Bf4. If you compare the position you will see great similarities but there are still some differences. The most important is that Black after 5.Bf4 is rarely able to exchange the black squared bishops quickly, which after 5.Bg5 is often accomplished by Nf6-e4 (d5) followed by a quick simplification. This is rarely the case after 5.Bf4, here the game remains complicated and difficult. The second difference is that Black has no problems at all to push through the c7-c5 advance because his knight f6 is not pinned. This attack on d4 often leads to a black passed pawn on d4 which is blocked by White on d3, a constellation that influences the further course of the game.

The Mega Database Output Report shows that many top Strong Grandmaster, all above an Elo of 2600, have used this line successfully as White;
Loek Van Wely 43 games Result =26/43 60%,
Vadimir Kramnik 14 games Result=10 5/14 71%,
Boris Gelfand 17 games Result=10/17 59%,
Viktor Kortschnoj 16 games Result=10/16 63%,
Gary Kasparov 9 games Result=7/9 78%,
Velelin Topalov 8 games Result=5 5/8 63%,
Ivan Sokolov 8 games Result=5/8 63%,
Michal Krasenkow 6 games Result=4 5/6 67%,
Vassily Ivanchuk 7 games Result=4/7 57%,
Alexander G. Beliavsky 8 games Result=4/8 50%.

The Mega Database output report shows in its Statistics from the 3594 games in the Mega Database of 2002 that White had scored an impressively 63%.

White wins: 1579=44%, Draws: 1380=38%, Black wins: 633=18%
White wins are of average length 40. Black wins are of average length 40 and Draws are shorter than average 33.

Seven other notable players have also done well:
M. Gurevich in particular plays White regularly and in 22 games won 26 for an impressive 85% win record between 1988-2001. His Elo is 2633.
Ivan Farago Result=19 5/29 =66% 1968-1999 Elo 2500
Gyozo V. Forintos Result=19 5/26=73% 1963-1994 Elo 2446
Lajos Portisch Result=16 5/23=70% 1963-1994 Elo 2620
Vladimir Epishin Result=1621=76% 1992-2001 Elo 2620
Adrian Mikhalchishin Result=15 5/20=75% 1980-2001 Elo 2518
Anthony J. Miles Result=13/17=76% 1977-1994 Elo 2577

Main Line: 6Bxc5 7.e3 0-0 8.Qc2 Nc6 9.a3 Qa5 60% 2520 399 games
6Na6 7.e3 Nxc5 8.cxd5 46% 2407 12 games

Moves and Plans

a) 5...0-0 You should play 6.e3
Black scores below average at 39%

Main Line: 6c5 7.dxc5 Bxc5 8.Qc2 Nc6 9.a3 Qa5 60% 2520 399 games 6c6 69% 2411 506 games 6b6 67% 2482 391 games
Critical line: 6c5 7.dxc5 Qa5 8.a3 dxc4 9.Bxc4 64% White

b) 5...c5 You should play 6.dxc5
Black scores below average at 39%

Critical Line: 6Na6 7.e3 Nxc5 8.cxd5 Nxd5 25% White
Plans for White:
e2-e3/c4xd5/bf1-e2/0-0 (12 games) e2-e3/Qd1-c2/a2-a3/0-0-0 (5 games) Bf1-e2/0-0/Nf3-d4/Be2-f3 (3 games) 0-0/Bf4-e5/Be5-d4/Rf1-d1/Ra1-c1 (2 games) Bf1-b5/..(Bc8-d7)/Bb5xd7/0-0/Qd1-e2 (3 games) E2-e3/..(Nf6xd5)/Nc3xd5/Bf1-d3 (7 games)

c) 5...c6 You should play 6.e3
Black scores badly at 27%

d) 5...dxc4 You should play 6.e4
BLACK SCORES ABOVE AVERAGE AT 47%
De Coverly - Boucher
Mangei - Rolli
Sakaev - Kostic
Greenfeld - Zak
Solozhenkin - Kveinys

e) 5...a6 You should play 6.e3
Black scores badly at 34%

f)5...Nbd7 You should play 6.e3
Black scores miserably at only 17%

g)5...Ne4 You should play 6.Qc2
Black scores miserably at only 0%

h)5...Nh5 You should play 6.Bd2
Black scores miserably at only 15%

i) 5...Nc6 You should play 6.e3
Black scores miserably at only 17%

j) 5...b6 You should play 6.e3
Black scores miserably at only 0%

k) 5...Bd6 You should play 6.Bxd6
Black scores miserably at only 20%

Main Lines
1. 6.e3 a6
Summary: The variation 6.e3 a6 is not Black's best choice, and with precise play White obtains an opening advantage.

2. 6b6
50-0 6.e3 b6 The oldest continuation which Blackburne's opponents played back in 1887! Black wants to develop as in the Tartiakower-system: (5.Bg5 0-0 6.e3 h6 7.Bh4 b6): the bishop is fianchettoed, the knight can go to any of the squares a6, c6, or d7, and the pawn on c7 advances to c5. The second player is not afraid of hanging pawns which often arise. It is good for White that compared to the Tartakower-system, the black-squared bishops are difficult to exchange.
Summary: 6b6 is a slightly passive but solid continuation. In the main line 7.cxd5 Black should opt for 7Nxd5 which offers him good attacking prospects. However, the old move 7exd5 leads to a position without perspective.

3. 6c6
Black plays in the style of the Orthodox Queen's Gambit. Next move, he will play 7Nbd7 and, if possible, plans to exchange White's Bf4 with Nh5. Usually, he develops his queenside in the following way: b7-b5, a7-a6, Bb7, c6-c5. White has several good options.
Summary: The line 6...c6 does not promise Black complete equality, White has several good options and has a long-term pressure.

4. 6Nbd7
To date this variation of 6...Nbd7, is one of the most important in the 5.Bf4-System. Originally played in orthodox fashion (intending a6, dxc4, b5) it has become enormously popular during the last 3-4 years because Black has the active option to counter with c7-c5. There are two important variations to examine, 7.Qc2 and 7.c5, we should take a closer look at these ideas.
1. Variation 7.Qc2
2. Version 7.c5
Summary: The line 6...Nbd7 is one of Black's best defensive options. For the time being, it is difficult to decide which is the best way for White, in each variation Black reaches an equal game.

5. 6c5 7.dxc5
Summary: The variation 6c5 7.dxc5 Nc6 leads to positions with an isolated queen pawn which are better for White; Black is forced to defend for a long time.

6. 7Bxc5 8.Be2
In the 90's this line became very popular and despite being rivaled somewhat by the variation 8.cxd5 it still is. The move has two basic ideas: 1) Before finishing his development White starts to play on the queenside in particular, White delays to move the Bf1 to avoid wasting a tempo after dxc4
2) a2-a3 is purely prophylactic and with his next move White continues to develop.
Summary: 8.Be2 does not make life difficult for Black. After 8dxc4 9.Bxc4 he can choose between 9Qxd1+ 10.Rxd1 Rb4!? and 9a6, in both cases with a good game.

7. 8.a3 Nc6
Summary: It is not without reason that the variation 8.a3 enjoys great popularity. Both White and Black have a large variety of options. After 8Nc6 9.b4 it seems as if 9Bd6! Is the safest continuation for Black. However, in the variation 9Be7 10.cxd5 Nxd5 11.Nxd5 exd5 the second player has to show a certain amount of patience to be able to reach equality. Modest, but venomous is 9.Be2, after which 9dxc4 10.Bxc4 Qxd1+ can be recommended for Black. Quite flexible is 9.Rc1; here Black has to choose between three continuations of roughly equal strength: 9dxc4. 9d4 and 9a6 10.b4 Bd6.

8. 9.Rc1 dxc4 10.Bxc4 Qxd1+
Summary: The resulting endgame is slightly better for White but with careful (and quite often passive) play Black is able to equalize. This lack of active possibilities is probably the reason why most Black player do not want to enter this line.

9. 8.cxd5 Nxd5 9.Nxd5 exd5 10.a3
Summary: The variation 10. a3 Nc6 11.Bd3 leads to a position with chances for both sides and it is not astonishing that it enjoys the greatest popularity. While White can count on a small advantage after 11Be7 and 11Bd6. 11Bb6 12.0-0 Bg4 offers good counter-chances for Black.

10. 8Qc2 Nc6 9.a3 Qa5 10.Nd2
Summary: In the line 8Qc2 Nc6 9.a3 Qa5 10.Nd2 a final conclusion is still a long time off. After 10Bb4 11.cxd5 exd5 Black faces some difficulties; safer is 11Nxd5.

11. 10.Rd1 Be7 11.Nd2 e5 12.Bg5
After the Kortschnoj-Karpov match in Baguio Citiy in 1978 this variation became very popular and for some time was often played. But Black discovered safe ways to equalize and therefore it is now a rare quest in modern tournament practice.
Summary: The variation 10.Rd1 Be7 11.Nd2 did not lose support. The results of this line are not really convincing for White; with 13Qb6 Black can successfully head for a draw while he also obtains very good counter-chances with 13Qd8.

12. 10.0-0-0
This continuation was first played by G.Kaidanov in 1988 and quickly became popular. In the years 1988-93 a lot of games were played with this line, and in 1995 saw a second wave of popularity when Garry Kasparov twice employed the move 11.h4 in Novgorod. Black discovered some good defensive possibilities and recently the excitement about this variation. Ebbed down.
Summary: The variation 10.0-0-0 leads to a game with chances for both sides. After the main continuations 11.g4 and 11.h4 Black seems to have found good defensive possibilities. Relatively unexplored are 11.Kb1 and 11.Nd2, here both sides have enough room for mutual improvements.

If you compare the 5.Bf4-System with the main lines of the Queen's Gambit after 5.Bg5 in the latest ChessBase MegBase Database, you will find that the former has been played considerably less often. On the other hand, particularly during the last years 5.Bf4 has become enormously popular. This is due to the great reliability of the black build-up in the Tartakower and the Lasker systems (5.Bg5 0-0 6.e3 h6 7.Bh4 b6 or 7Ne4).

Now White is trying to avoid these systems and has discovered 5.Bf4. If you compare the positions you will see great similarities but there are still some differences. The most important is that Black after 5.Bf4 is rarely able to exchange the black-squared Bishops quickly, which after 5.Bg5 is often accomplished by Nf6-e4 (d5) followed by a quick simplification. This is rarely the case after 5.Bf4, here the game remains complicated and very difficult. The second difference is that Black has no problems at all to push through the c7-c5 advance because his knight f6 is not pinned. This attack on d4 often leads to a black passed pawn on d4, which is blocked by White on d3, a constellation that influences the further course of the game.

In the 3636 complete games with 5.Bf4 on my ChessBase MegaBase CD, White scored impressively and made 63% of all possible points. Nearly all top players have employed the 5.Bf4-System. With White it was regularly played by Gurevich 84%, Wely 61%, Kramnik 80% Kasparov 79%, Topalov 69%, Bareev 75% and Sakaev 86%.

Twelve of the most important strategic ideas

On my Database in the 3657 games, 255 are commentated. And in these games the important parts could be divided into twelve of the most important strategic ideas. Each of these strategic ideas could receive a lot of text on the advantages and disadvantages of each of these variations.

However at the average rating level of play that this opening is going to see at FICS it is hardly worth spending the many hours needed to thoroughly explain each of these 12 strategic ideas in detail.

The average player at FICS is not going to get involved in master level variations and advanced strategic concepts such as these variations get involved in. These variations start at move 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10.

Here are the 12 variations in brief:

1. (6.e3 a6) 1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.c4 e6 4.Nc3 Be7 5.Bf4 0-0 6.e3 a6 Black wants to play dxc4 and b7-b5. Most popular is: 6...Ne4 6...Nc6 6...Re8 6.Bb4 6...0-0. Best for White is if Black plays 6...Ne4, 0-0, 6...Na6
Llanos - Lujan
Hamadi - Craggs

2. (6...b6) 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 d5 4.Nc3 Be7 5.Bf4 0-0 6.e3 b6 7.cxd5 Nxd5 Next best is 8.Bg3 (50-0 6.e3 b6) 7.cxd5 is the most popular move.
Fiedler - Pallova

3. (6...c6) 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 Be7 5.Bf4 0-0 6.e3 c6 7.Ne5 Nbd7 8.Bd3 dxc4 9.Nxc4 Nb6 The Classical Variation. Black plays in the style of the Orthodox Queen's Gambit. He plays 7Nbd7 and if possible plans to exchange White's Bf4 with Nh5. Usually he develops his queenside: d5xc4, b7-b5, a7a6, Bv7, c6-c5. White has several good options.
Georghiou - Raimbert

4. (6...Nbd7) 1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.c4 e6 4.Nc3 Be7 5.Bf4 0-0 6.e3 Nbd7 7.Be2 dxc4 8.bxc4 c5 To date this variation is one of the most important in the 5.Bf4-system. Originally played in Orthodox fashion (intending a6, dxc4, b5), it has become enormously popular during the last 3-4 years because Black has the active option to counter with c7-c5.
1. Variation 7.Qc2
2. Version 7.c5

5. (6c5 7.dxc5) 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Be7 4.Nf3 Nf6 5.Bf4 0-0 6.e3 c5 7.dxc5 dxc4 This is a less popular continuation.
Here is a great lesson on Endgame theory that you should not miss seeing.
Kljun - Radchenko

6. (7Bxc5 8.Be2) 1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.c4 e6 4.Nc3 Be7 5.Bf4 0-0 6.e3 c5 7.dxc5 Bxc5 8.Be2 dxc4! 9.Qxd8 Rxd8 10.Bxc4 Bv4 11.0-0 An unassuming continuation. White refrains from immediate action and develops. Meanwhile a number of good possibilities have been discovered for Black, and therefor 8.Be2 is only rarely played today.
Version 8...dxc4

7. (8.a3 Nc6) 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Be7 4.Nf3 Nf6 5.Bf4 0-0 6.e3 c5 7.dxc5 Bxc5 8.a3 Nc6 In the 90's this line became very popular and despite being rivaled somewhat by the variation 8.cxd5 or 9.cxd5 it still is. However the Chessbase opening report shows that Black scores below average with only a 37% with 8...Nc6,, and if White responds with 9.Qc2 White scores well with 66%.
Lets us take a look at the variation of 9.cxd5.
Hartung - Manne

8. {9.Rc1 dxc4 10.Bxc4 Qxd1+) 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 d5 4.Nc3 Be7 5.Bf4 0-0 6.e3 c5 7.dxc5 Bxc5 8.a3 Nc6 9.Rc1 dxc4 10.Bxc4 Qxd1+ This endgame, or similar one, very often arises in the 5.Bf4 system and therefore it deserves to be treated in a text file of its own. Depending on the variation the position under scrutiny might arise with one tempo more or less for White but the ideas remain the same.
Gelfand - Kramnik
Sakaev - Kholmov

9. (8.cxd5 Nxd5 9.Nxd5 exd5 10.a3 Bf5 11.Bd3) 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Be7 4.Nf3 Nf6 5.Bf4 0-0 6.e3 c5 7.dxc5 Bxc5 8.cxd5 Nxd5 9. Nxd5 exd5 10a3 Bf5 11.Bd3 Recently, this is the fashionable line. White treats the position with the isolated pawn in an unusual way, he allows the advance d5-d4 to counter it with e3-e4, instead of a knight blocking on d4 the bishop d3 becomes the piece which blocks.
The following game is a good example of how the D37 can win if you use your pieces effectively.
Akesson - Vernersson

(8.cxd5 Nxd5 9.Nxd5 exd5 10.a3 Bg4 11.Bd3 The threat of 12.Bxh7+ forces the black bishop to retreat. Thus Black has three plausible continuations: 1.11Be7, ll.11Bd6 and lll. 11Bb6
Rezsek - Horvath

10. (8.Qc2 Nc6 9.a3 Qa5 10.Rd1} 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Be6 4.Nf3 Nf6 5.Bf4 0-0 6.e3 c5 7.dxc5 Bxc5 8.Qc2 Nc6 9.a3 Qa5 10.Rd1 The old main line of 10.Nd2,is played less often now. My data base shows Black is often more successful with it. After the text move White has a number of options: castling queenside and launching a pawnstorm on the kingside, or playing Ra1-d1 to create pressure in the center had been successful for White.
Conquest - Greenfeld

11. (10.Rd1 Be7 11.Nd2 e5 12.Bg5 d4) 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 Be7 5.Bf4 0-0 6.e3 c5 7.dxc5 Bxc5 8Qc2 Nc6 9.a3 Qa5 10.Rd1 Be7 11.Nd2 e5 12.Bg5 d4. After the Kortschnoj - Karpov match in Baguio City in 1978 this variation became very popular and for some time was often played. But Black discovered safe ways to equalize and therefore it is now a rare guest in modern tournament practice. Black should play 10Be7 his best move. Black finds a good square for the precariously placed Bishop and prophylactically defends against a possible Bf4-g5. Other continuations are less convincing.
Kortschnoj - Karpov
Lumper - Blees
Portisch - Berger

12. (10.0-0-0) 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 d5 4.Nf3 Be7 5.Bf4 0-0 6.e3 c5 7.dxc5 Bxc5 8.Qc2 Nc6 9.a3 Qa5 10.0-0-0 This continuation was first played by G. Kaidanov in 1988 and quickly became popular. In the years 1988-93 a lot of games were played with this line, and in 1995 the line saw a second wave of popularity when G. Kasparov twice employed the move 11.h4 in Novgorod. Black discovered some good defensive possibilities and recently the excitement about this variation ebbed down.
In 10Be7 as in a lot of other variations Black improves the position of his Bishop while liberating the c-file. Apart from this move he also has a number of other options.
Kasparov Vaganian
Gurevich - Silva
Kaidanov - Murugan

Some common critical examples that you must know. From Twelve of the most important strategic ideas

From Version 2: 1.Nf3 d5
From Version 6: 9.Bxc4 a6
From Version 7: 8.a3 Nc6
From Version 8: Sakaev - Kholmov
From Version 11: 1.c4 Nf6

Games from the masters that all end in a mate!

1. Akesson Rodgaard
2. Skembris - Passerotti
3. Osterman - Krudde
4. Lempert - Neckar
5. Schwarz - Hissmann
6. Gurevich - Begovac
7. Acebal - Muniz
8. Bjornstad - Svendsen
9. Webers - Witt
10. Eriksen - Dolonen
11. Stolte - Becker
12. Gutlerrez - Planas
13. Cazorla - Egron
14. Halama - Schlosberg (18 Moves!)
15. Nilsson - Schmidt
16. Toth - Wallmeier (13 Moves !)
17. Shendrik - Gorozhankina
18. Goldberg - Chekhover
19. Ufimtsev - Verlinsky
20. Kreisberg - Barbagelata
21. Almada - Bustelo
22. Sichinava - Cech
23. Steinmueller - Wagner
24. Maiwald - Masserey
25. Koester - Langer
26. Bukal - Keglevic
27. Krawcewicz - Dymshits

Strongest moves made according to Chessbase's book window percentage score.
Strong Moves

Summary

The Queen's Gambit is probably the most popular opening on FICS. Most likely because at first glance it appears to be very easy to understand. However there are enough variations and material to study to last one a lifetime to try to master it. But for the average player to become somewhat of a specialist there is plenty of material explained in great detail here on our web site and should you read it all you will have gone a long way to become one.

Since it is so popular at FICS it would be most prudent and practical to begin a study program in its use. You could be a very shrewd and possible a very dangerous opponent just from reading all the material and going over the games presented here for your study. If you think its not worth your time consider this. How many ficsers do you think have gone through the trouble to study even a small amount of the material that you have here for your reading about it?

That's right, probably not even a small percent of it. So just think of the advantage you could have by doing so. You don't even have to try to memorize any of it, just going through the games alone will definitely give you a decided advantage.

The Queen's Gambit Declined, Has been a favored defense of nearly every World Champion. This fact alone should be enough to convince you of its soundness.

The Queen's Gambit Declined is one of the oldest and most classical of defenses and some would say its as old as the hills. It was first mentioned in the Gottingen manuscript in 1490 and analyzed in the early seventeenth century by Salvio and Greco. Perhaps the name "gambit" is a misnomer, because Black cannot really hold on to the pawn. In the nineteenth century it was considered by many to be an attempt to avoid the open clashes that resulted from the double king pawn openings. The percentage of games played with it began to rise in the last quarter of the nineteenth century, when the theories of Steinitz and Tarrasch began to percolate downward to the great mass of players.

Although Black plays 1d5 to equalize and prevent White from seizing control of the center. White sacrifices a pawn to gain an advantage in quick development.

The closed games normally begin with 1.d4 d5. Playing 1...d5 right away effectively rules out the advance of either e-pawn to the center. In general these openings lead to quieter, longer struggles. For Black, they have the advantage of being very solid. White may be able to squeak out a small initiative, but the ideal pawn center remain only a dream, The vulnerable f7 square is well shielded from activity by White's bishop or queen on the a2-g8 diagonal.

1.d4 d5

By an overwhelming margin, White's favored second move is: 2.c4
White immediately attacks the d5-pawn and threatens to capture and eliminate Black's center. By commencing the Queen's Gambit, White hopes to entice Black into capturing the c4-pawn, and after a subsequent recapture, White would then have a lead in development.

If White is allowed to play c4xd5 unimpeded, Black's center is destroyed.

1. 2...dxc4 (Queen's Gambit Accepted) By accepting the Queen's Gambit. Black shows a willingness to concede the center for rapid development. This is a dangerous strategy, but it has remained playable throughout the 20th century.

2. 2...e6 (Queen's Gambit Declined), the main line. One of the oldest and most classical of defenses, the Queen's Gambit Declined is found on the chessboard very frequently. Black will fight vigorously for control of the central squares, and develop quickly with ...Nf6, ...Be7, and kingside castling. The lack of open lines makes it very difficult for White to mount an effective attack. The only serious disadvantage of the opening is the blocking of the bishop at c8, which can lead to a bad bishop in the endgame. After suitable development, Black will work toward advancing the e-pawn to e5 in the early middlegame. Black Players who are impatient to see the light-squared bishop get into the game generally prefer the Slav Defense or the Tarrasch Defense.

Here is our training material on this great opening.

Queen's Gambit Declined. 11 variations. Cambridge Springs, etc.

Go to The Minority Attack, The Carlsbad Variation History and find out why the Cambridge Springs was formed, and its importance to the Queen's Gambit

Understanding The Queen's Gambit

   
   
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